Author Archives: Phil Monahan

23.11–The Joy of Youth


Written by: Phil Monahan

Puppies need exercise, but too much can cause exhaustion or even joint damage, especially in bigger dogs. As a puppy grows, the amount of daily exercise should increase by 5 minutes per month. For example, 3-month-old puppies should have at least 15 minutes of exercise each day, increasing to 20 minutes at 4 months. These […]

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24.11–Autumn Paddle


Written by: Phil Monahan

Each autumn, the mountains of Vermont explode into color, drawing “leaf peepers” from around the world. The brilliant hillsides also add a rich backdrop to a morning paddle on Lake Shaftsbury for Maggie, Henry, and Gilly. The amazing tapestry occurs when the chlorophyll in the leaves of deciduous trees breaks down due to changes in […]

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25.11–Acadia Natives


Written by: Phil Monahan

The Atlantic coast of Maine is a harsh environment for a brook trout, yet these hardy natives have existed in the streams and ponds of Acadia National Park since the last ice age. Brook trout require cold, clean well-oxygenated water to survive, and many coastal habitats were lost to land clearing and dams. Luckily, the […]

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26.11–The Inside Passage


Written by: Phil Monahan

The Alaska portion of the Inside Passage, stretching from the Dixon Entrance on the USA-Canada border north to Skagway, offers boats protection from the winds and harsh weather of the northern Pacific Ocean. However, the tides can be extreme, and ship captains and pilots need to be on their toes to avoid grounding. The waters […]

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28.11–Trout Feast


Written by: Phil Monahan

Cutthroat trout are known for their lazy takes, as they eat adult mayflies off the water’s surface. When a mayfly transforms from a nymph to a dun (or subimago), it cannot fly until its wings dry, so it is helpless for a brief period. Trout take advantage of the situation, gorging on the immobile insects. […]

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29.11–Lord of the Flats


Written by: Phil Monahan

Nurse sharks, Ginglymostoma cirratum, inhabit many bonefish flats, and while the fish display the dorsal fin and profile that send a shiver down the spine of anyone who has seen Jaws, the species is usually not aggressive. In fact, swimming with nurse sharks is a popular tourist experience, as these predators can seem downright friendly to humans […]

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01.12–Tasmanian Spines


Written by: Phil Monahan

The short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) is a mammal native to Australia and New Guinea–this one was filmed in Tasmania–and like the platypus, it lays eggs. Echidnas have very short, strong limbs with large claws, and are powerful diggers. Their claws on their hind limbs are elongated and curved backward to help aid in digging. If […]

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